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17 September, 2014

T Splice Demo Cleaned Audio

T splice soldering demo video. Same one I had uploaded before, only changes made was that I used the full version of Power Director instead of demo, and I cleaned up the audio in Audactiy. It's not perfect, but it is MUCH easier to listen to this way...



Need For Thread Locker

Here's a little video with me talking about the need for thread locker...



14 September, 2014

Fixing what's not broken, and a bit of a review on what I use to bring this to you...

Okay folks, I have been just swamped, beyond words swamped... I am presently over my head with things to do. I am working my day job, have several other irons in the fire, and am working on the podcasting / video podcasting setup and shooting videos etc...

I was planning on shooting a quick video and write up of fixing a compressed air piping system leak as I found a leak at the thread joint in the manifold, well I had disconnected the manifold and let it sit while I worked on other issues, and honestly got time away from my studies, my work, and my wife, and went out to do the video and fix the leak...

Guess what disappeared?

If you guessed that the leak went away nowhere to be found you'd be 100% correct!

Go figure...

Oh well, so that's a bust. I bet it will leak again, I should be more ready to tackle it next time anyway...

So, instead of a video on the fixing of compressed air plumbing leaks, I present to you now the maiden voyage of my current, and likely final audio recording setup for the podcasts, and video podcasts. I am set up with a Behringer XENYX 1202FX mixer, Behriner UCA200 USB Audio Interface, a Neewer XLR cable / microphone boom arm and shock mount, and a Behringer C1 large diaphragm condenser microphone. I have a pop filter on the way, but looking at the delivery date scheuled, it must be coming by sailing ship from China... The nice thing about this particular mic though is it is sensitive enough I can have the mic far away from my mouth and still pick up my voice quite nicely!


Well, there it is, thanks for watching, and hopefully you got something out of this!

09 September, 2014

Haven't forgotten about y'all... Sidelined with work, and setting up the recording studio.

I have a few videos being processed and voiced over right now for the blog, but for the most part, I am swamped with paid work, and studying for my upcoming RHCE exam. Yes I am a Linux geek. It pays the bills, so I need to keep up with it...

No small part of my voice over work is going to require moving my home office, which has been in the planning stages for several years now, and is finally coming into reality. The reason for this is actually multiple reasons.

#1. My current home office has the outside AC unit just below the window, I get LOTS of AC noise in the office / studio, meaning I have to run my gain way down, and do a LOT of noise filtering, which makes my voice sound muddy.
#2. The wall / door / window layout of the current office does not work with the larger pieces of wall centric furnishings needed for the office. The new one does.
#3. The new office is central to the house, and as such, will make it somewhat easier to finish up the structured wiring project for the house. I am NOT enclosing in a cabinet though. My structured wiring will be run into a wall mounted rack. Considering the size of my IP network, it's MUCH better this way. Anything that CAN have a wired IP connection WILL. I know 802.11ac can go up to 1750mbps, but in actual function, isn't likely to. I prefer hard wired. I know I'm werid.
#4. The remodel project is making me purge junk from the spare bedroom and home office. By the time I have the office moved into the new room, I should just have to slap paint on ceiling, walls and trim, rip out carpet and tack strip, lay down laminate, replace junk sockets and switches for fresh Decora units, Clean / repaint ceiling fan (white blades are turning gray). Swap out old window covering for new "Texas Flag Theme" window coverings, move furnishings and knick knacks in, make the bed with the "Texas Flag Theme" bedding, and call it DONE.

FWIW, the bed is a Full size memory foam mattress on a roller frame that I will be building a Texas Star 2x4 and panel headboard for. (Already have the design, just need to build it).

I will be setting up the home office / recording studio for multiple purposes. I mentioned it was to be a music room..


My music room equipment configuration plan is also complete. I haven't yet decided on a digital piano, but my wife wants one, so I am planning to put one in. The guitar and guitar amp actually belong to a friend, however he is looking to sell to me for a fair price.


During the remodel I will be doing some video of removing carpet, tack strip, filing and smoothing the concrete and laying down the laminate. I hope you folks are going to stick around with me long enough to catch the videos and enjoy them! I need to figure out a way to speed up my work flow!

04 September, 2014

Cleaning up non shop related messes, and fixing a HUGE design flaw.

One of the serious drawbacks to having a home workshop that is physically attached to the home A.K.A. in the garage is spouses. 

Simply put my wife's flower pots are pretty much everywhere in the shop now (again). She wanted to paint the pots to mimic Mexican Talavera pottery, put them all out in my shop, along with the supplies, and has since forgotten about them... 

I need to gather them up, stash them in the corner with the lawn and garden stuff and get them away from my workspace.

I also have plenty of self induced chaos that I need to clear up. Tools need to go back into the tool box and cabinets, supplies need to be stashed where they belong, and overall the shop needs a good sweeping...

Once the shop is clean, and vaguely presentable, I plan on starting back up on my video series, and do a video on soldering etc...

I have recently assembled one of those particle board filing cabinets (the demo model in store was DEFINATELY a combination of ply and solid wood, this particle board ticks me off to no end but I digress), and there was a HUGE problem with assembly. The back panel of the filing cabinet, the one that keeps it from racking, well the so called hardboard was nothing more than overglorified cardboard, and the nails pulled through almost instantly. I have LOTS of tempered hardboard in the shop. Which is one reason to get the shop clean, so I can cut a proper sized hardboard back panel and attach it. I will likely use pnuematic nails and glue to make sure it doesn't go anywhere. I am also planning on adding some bracing / glue blocks for leveling feet. 

If nothing else, I have a set of decent dimensions to work out a filing cabinet / drawer plan for myself to come up with a plan and build from. 

22 August, 2014

The Daves Workshop / Wildersport Outdoors podcasting audio studio is live!

I have the audio studio set up and tested. I put up a video / audio clip slideshow on youtube walking you through... Like I said, I am working my tail off trying to get Daves Workshop media to be first rate to make your time spent here to be as enjoyable and productive as possible!

I wasn't happy with my sound editing on the video I initially posted. I made some changes, and re-uploaded the video, the URL has changed, take a peek, it sounds MUCH better. (Thank God for Audacity Compressor function!)

Thanks for visiting.



17 August, 2014

XENYX 502 Podcaststudio usb mic port test



I have been in discussion with some folks about this issue. In my efforts to produce a better product for my readers / viewers I am wanting to produce quality audio, and video, I made this quick and honestly lazy presentation / test of the mixing board that came with my podcaststudio kit, and shows how a simple, very small mixer will allow for multiple microphone connections. Admittedly the channel 2 connection isn't ideal as it bypasses the equalizer circuitry, but it will work well enough for studio guests if I ever get them in... Yes folks I have ideas for where I want to take this blog, and I am looking at breaking into podcast / video podcasting territory...



11 August, 2014

Crash course to better serve my readers / viewers!

I am wanting to provide instructional / educational resources on my blog, and honestly the audio from my Camcorder stinks. I am also considering making a recurring podcast for those audio oriented folks, so I am crash coursing on using some home recording gear that is not attached to the camera, doing some intense video editing, and other multimedia work that I honestly haven't done any of since before Adobe Systems acquired Macromedia, so if it seems like I am taking longer between posts, there is a good reason for it. Think of it as the human version of electrolysis rust removal for the brain...

And before I get any more email on the subject, I wanted to let everyone know what I am doing with this blog / video / podcast I am hoping to make completely unique. While you will undoubtedly see similarities between my content, and the content of others, and I would be lying if I said others don't inspire me and my desire to dive deeper down this rabbit hole, I first and foremost have fun with what I am doing, I don't limit myself to talking about just one subject (Such as woodworking, automotive, outdoorsmanship, faith, family, etc...) rather I am using this as a platform to cover what interests me, and I use it as a way to help you along the process. I assume some knowledge, but try to keep that assumption as basic as possible, and I am open to feedback. If I went over something too fast, ask me for clarification and I will be more than happy to oblige!

I sincerely hope you enjoy the content I am putting up here as much as I enjoy creating it for you, and that you express that enjoyment by either donating to my site by purchasing products from my Amazon Store. And of course you are free to send a gift via PayPal with the PayPal link on the main page. Sadly the PayPal and Amazon e-stores don't link together... I will post up the best bargains I can find on anything and everything that I think might be of interest, and certainly what I feature in my posts, assuming it is available on Amazon. I will also let you know when an item is better priced elsewhere! Your purchases and gifts will help offset my costs, and help me justify what I am doing with this to my wife thus enabling me to keep diving down this crazy rabbit hole!

02 August, 2014

Making the tee splice in the 7 pin wiring harness.

Hopefully you can make heads or tails of the video. Sorry. I obviously have not figured out the finery of Youtube video publishing... Hopefully I will get better, soon...

If you have been following this on the forum, you will notice the use of a yellow wire to tie into a red wire. That is intentional as it meets the requirements of my documented circuit design.

As a reminder the design of the circuit is as follows...

12V red power feeds the hot side of supply side of a SPST illuminated switch which is already installed in the dashbaord. Sorry if you wanted to see that done. I figured that was so basic as to not be worth my effort of documenting... I can do a fresh one if you'd like... Another 12V red power feed runs and terminates at terminal 87 on the relay. Thus feeding power to the relay.

The load side of the SPST switch is a green wire in the diagram, I will likely use white as it is what I have, and is routed to share a common lug with the yellow wire we just soldered on, and those will terminate on terminal 86 of the relay.

Terminal 85 will have a black wire run to a grounded ring terminal.

Terminal 30 will be a blue wire feeding back, and a Y splice shooting 2 wires off, 1 to each of the LED reverse lamps. (The 2 pin couplers actually). The couplers other side will be soldered to a short black lead attaching to ring terminals at the mount and grounding as close as possible to the mount.

As many of the connections as possible will be either weathertight, or soldered. I don't EVER want water problems with my circuit...



I MAY switch wire color from switch to relay to blue, and use white wire from relay to lamps. The lamps are factory wired white / black, and I don't have any green wire.  The relay is to be mounted underhood, so I am figuring I will need to carry 2 wires via a split loom to the front of the truck from the back, the yellow signal wire from the reverse light circuit, and the white power feed wire to the lamps. The relay can be grounded in the engine compartment, and the lamps themselves can be grounded at the frame mounting tab the lamps will mount to. This will minimize the amount of wire actually run throughout the vehicle, and theoretically at least, minimize the weight gain on the truck, by at least a few ounces, but every bit adds up!


A close up view, and sorry my camera work is a little jiggly here, but that red wire is heading straight to the center pin. According to every manual I have seen that is the reverse light wire, so that is the one we are going after!



So we fish back through the split loom a few inches back and fish that red wire out so we can trim the insulation off of it and make our solder joint. My camera work here is MUCH better as I wasn't trying to one hand it...



Strip back the insulation on the wire you are going to solder to the main, stripping enough insulation to make 5 full turns around the main wire.


If using stranded wire, twist the wires together before wrapping, at least this is the habit I got into. When you are done with your wraps it should look like the photo above...


In future videos the sound will be much improved. I didn't really need to be narrating it while I was shooting except my old M-audio duo USB isn't compatible with any OS newer than Windows 98... I could barely get it working in XP, but under Windows 8.1 forget it... I've got some new equipment coming from Behringer that should allow me to get back up to speed audio wise...

26 July, 2014

Notice to spammers...

You guys must be a special kind of stupid...

I moderate comments and while I will approve comments that disagree with me or take contrary view points, spam will be rejected offhand and reported.

For what it's worth I believe spammers should be rolled naked in thumb tacks and dipped in rubbing alcohol and rubbed down with salt.

But keep your chins up. In my book spammers still rank above Lawyers and child molesters... Ever so slightly, but still above.

25 July, 2014

Hunting and gathering for the trailer light / backup light installation.

So as of noon today, almost everything I need for this project is in hand, I think...

Large ring terminals for 22 ga wire seem to be extensively difficult to come by, so I am going to take a different approach, I have 2 wires that need to be ring connected to the battery stud, a 22 ga wire for the switch, and either 22 or 16 ga wire to go to the relay. So I figure I use a 16-14 ga ring terminal with a 1/4" ring and solder the two wires together and crimp that all it, I should be good to go!


The bag in the middle area is the relays, relay sockets, and ATC fuse holders. These things are major overkill for this task, but I am a firm believer in better safe than sorry... Not to the degree engineers are, but you get the idea...

Looking at the AWG ampacity ratings, my 2@ 18 watt lights will draw a total of 36 watts, and that means 3 amps, the charts for chassis wiring, which is what this technically is, rates 22 awg at 7 amps, WAY above what this will actually draw, or even think of drawing...

Now if we look back I think it was 3 posts ago, when I discussed designing the circuit, you will recall that the red wire comes from 12V source (battery) the black wire goes to chassis ground, and the blue wire feeds power to the lights.

It just so happens that I have the black and red wires in 16 ga, and digging through my toolbox I found 16 ga blue wire from the pilot off road lighting kit I never ended up using (and wish I knew where the relay from THAT went...)

In my digging to find my soldering iron, and spool of solder, I found a spool of white 16 ga wire as well... The green and yellow wires being signal wire being 22 ga is fine... So I am good to go, at least once I find the shrink tubing... I know I had it around here somewhere...

24 July, 2014

Dealing well with the pressures...

I just wanted to touch base with those that have been following my compressed air system journey. I realized my last entry on this issue was on June 8. I have been keeping the compressors powered off except when I am actively using them, but keeping the tanks pressurized. The system is holding pressure perfectly. The only time the compressors cycled was during hard use... I couldn't be happier...

Auxiliary LED reverse lighting continued. Prepping the brackets.

Simply put, these lights HAVE to work, and they HAVE to be out of the way when backing up, especially off road.

Now when I was considering how to add additional reverse lighting to my truck I will be completely honest, hanging LED fixtures were not at the top of my list. I was originally considering adding some of those 6" oval LED fixtures cut in to the rear bumper. Mostly for clearance sake. But I could see a minor bump in traffic causing damage, and honestly, I was having a very tough time finding sufficient quality fixtures for my application. Most of them are either REALLY expensive, or to be polite, severely lacking in build quality.

While I was looking for insipration, I came across F150Online.com member lakemarykid's beautiful Oxford White / Pueblo gold 2 tone 2007 F150 FX4 Supercrew. The job he did on the install looks great, although he is only powered by a dash switch.


Now the brackets he used are something used in commercial construction, not readily available to the average DIYer, so I had to take a different approach, but then again, what I used followed the same idea at least...

Yes, there was some DIY to it...

Step #1. Look around the shop and see what I have on hand. The aluminum angle I was planning on using appears to be all used up, so option #2. Use flat steel and make it the shape I want...
Step #2. I know I want a 1.5 x 1.5 L section with 5/16" holes for the bolts, so I take the 1.5" wide steel stock and measure up 1.5" up, using a sharpie mark a fold line, another 1.5" up and mark a cut line...
Step #3. Secure the stock in the bench vise, and using my 4.5" angle grinder, Harbor Freight cut off wheels, and of course safety glasses, respiratory, and hearing protection, made my cut.
Step #4. Repeate step #s 2 and 3 for the second bracket.
Step #5. Using a straight edge and sharpie, mark center of each half segment so there are two X's on each piece. 
Step #6. Using a punch and hammer, dimple the center to guide the drill bit.
Step #7. Secure the work pieces, and drill a 5/16" hole at each dimple.
Step #8. Using a file, clean up all cut lines, corners, and drill hole edges, insuring that a 5/16" fastener can easily pass through.
Step #9.  Using a machinists vise, secure the work piece such that the fold line is just at the top of the jaw, and squared to the jaw. Lock the jaws down so the piece can not move, and using a large, broad headed steel hammer bend the pieces to a 90 degree angle.
Step #10. Using a disposable cloth paper towel, shop rag in a box type of rag, and at least rubbing alcohol if not a stronger solvent that does NOT leave a residue, thoroughly clean all surfaces.
Step #11. Scuff surfaces with sandpaper, clean off any dust / residue then prime, and paint with at least 3 coats of rust inhibiting paint. You can also use plastidip if you'd like.

Your brackets are now ready! You can go ahead and bolt the light to the bracket using the provided bolts, however I would suggest instead sourcing up stainless steel replacements, and an additional pair of 5/16 x I think it is 1" stainless steel bolt, flat washer, and nylon insert lock nut to secure to the frame of the truck...

So you want to know where to find the bargains?

Harbor Freight 4.5" angle grinder. If you have a HF close, these are so cheap even if it breaks after a year or so just toss it and get a new one... Mine is an older B&D I bought at Walmart, the HF grinder seems to be better made...

4.5" metal cut off wheel for the angle grinder? Yeah HF has those too! I have used the ones from the big box stores, and the HF ones actually seem to hold together better...

I could give you a link to online ordering the flat stock, or easier yet, aluminum angle but get the stuff locally. It will be cheaper. Shipping on that stuff with eat you up!

Center punch. Yeah Amazon has those cheap. The HF ones I have tried are junk. The Stanley is okay, great considering it is dirt cheap and likely to get lost before you dull it... I have them in my Amazon affiliate store.

If you are like me and like to have the big box of crayons to color with as it were, and like having your bits etc... come in large sets, probably THE most impressive set of bits I have used to date are the DeWalt pilot point bits. They do help make drilling metals much easier. The DW1969 29 piece set is on Amazon at the lowest price I have seen recently...

For a lower budget option, you could try the Warrior 29 piece Titanium Nitride bit set from Harbor Freight. Mind you, I have not tried them out yet so I can not attest to their quality, or even usefulness. If anyone wants to donate a set for testing I would happily accept and test the snot out of a set of these...

Most of the items needed for this project have arrived already. I have 2 items left to have come in, One was due to an error in my observation. They are...

#1. The Tow Read 118136 Universal plug mount bracket. I thought I didn't need it, but I was wrong. It happens...
#2 12 volt illuminated rocker switch with green LED. I figure instead of the high dollar switches, which mind you are ultra cool, but pricey, that LakeMaryKid used, I figured I would color code. Keep the Red LED rocker for the front off road lights, and use a green LED rocker for the rear reverse / flood lights.

Package tracking says I should have all that stuff in hand tomorrow afternoon, so I should be moving forward with this project, and some work on the Saturn this weekend...

So stick with me, and enjoy as I document how the project all comes together!

22 July, 2014

Adding LED reverse lighting, and 7 pole trailer plug.

Anyone that has ever backed up in the dark, rainy, unlit night with factory reverse lights know the white knuckle braille experience it can be, now put yourself out on the deer lease, or in the mountains somewhere in those same conditions, you are going to want light and a lot of it...

Now my project here is twofold,

Fisrt off, I am wanting to add the final piece of the OEM "Towing Package" that my truck did not ship from Ford with and that is the 7 pin wiring pig tail under the rear bumper. It's a good thing this is a common part, and lots of the aftermarket produce OEM quality or better replacement pieces, and an even better thing that Ford designed the wiring harness to be modular. Simply snap on / snap off and you are good to go!

Second issue I need to tackle is the extreme need for radically improved back up lighting. Simply put, backing up this beast in the dark is a dangerous, white knuckle affair. I have wanted upgraded lighting on the tail end of this truck for years. And with the new LED lighting fixtures coming down radically in price, it looks like it is time to tackle this project! Tons of light, great durability, and greatly reduced power draw. What's not to like?

So first things first, design the setup and start hunting and gathering what I will need to make these changes, and get the knowledge I need to do the job...

Thankfully TowReady has part number 118247 trailer wiring and relay kit available at a variety of retailers. www.etrailer.com provides a pretty decent video instruction on how to install it. I WILL be varying my install from etrailers install. Their install is using a band clamp on a round tube trailer hitch, my hitch is square tube and I honestly think Etrailers use of a band clamp is beyond pitiful. It is barely better than bailing wire and bubble gum. I want this done RIGHT... So please ignore that part on their video. I will attampt to shoot and edit my own video on this project, so hopefully you will have something a bit better quality to work with...

Mind you, etrailer has been kind of nasty about this as they have disallowed embedding of the Youtube video, but I CAN give you the link... The video overall is decent, but like I said, they cut a HUGE corner quality wise in the install by relying on a band clamp. That just will not do!

Anyway the video link is HERE.

Like I promised on my forum posts, I will post the links to the products and the best prices I could find to get the job done, so if you go to my Amazon Store at http://astore.amazon.com/davework-20?_encoding=UTF8&node=14

There are 2 items that while I can find at Amazon that there are MUCH better buys at Harbor Freight tools if you have one of them close by...

127 piece Heat Shrink Tubing.

10 rolls 60ft 3/4" electrical tape.

I assume "normal" mechanical ability, and equipment. Feel free to add crimp connectors in place of solder connections. I personally prefer solder joints over crimp connectors, particularly in 4 wheel drive / off road applications.

So now that all the bits and pieces are on order, I ought to share with you the design for the circuit.


I am giving serious consideration to adding a 3amp diode inline on the feed line from the backup lights.

FWIW, this circuit design should work with any 12V DC vehicle with a factory back up lighting circuit where the desired end result is the accessory reverse lights turned on with both the vehicle being put in reverse, AND the lights being manually turned on with an interior mounted toggle switch with illumination that will allow you to tell if you accidentally left the lights on...

If I opt for the diode and I suspect I will so that I don't induce back feed into an unenergized reverse light circuit, the best price I have found so far is at Radio Shack...

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062578

So now that the design is shored up, and the parts are ordered (somehow Amazon Prime 2 day sometimes means 9 days...).

Before moving forward, there is some equipment you will need to round up. This is...

  1. Factory jack, and handle for operating the spare tire winch.
  2. Wheel chocks, chunks of 4x4, whatever...
  3. Floor jack capable of safely lifting the truck. I opted for the Pittsburgh Automotive 4 ton item #68056. Purchased on sale, with a 25% off coupon so it wasn't that bad...
  4. Jack stands with sufficient height and weight handling capacity to give you ample room and safe load rating to work on the truck safely. I opted for the Pittsburgh Automotive 6 ton Steel Jack Stands item #61197. Same deal as the floor jack...
  5. I am not going to bother with linking one as you really ought to have it by now if you are wanting to take on this project, but you need a socket / ratchet set, deep well, in metric. The Etrailer video shows using an electric impact, no real need, and if I was going to I would go pnuematic not electric...
  6. Crimp tool.
  7. A basic soldering iron
  8. Lighter.
  9. Drill and bits.
  10. Screwdriver set.
I'm sure I will come up with something I forgot about while I am actually working the project. I will make note of it in the video, AND come back and update the list here.

So for now I bid you a good night, and promise that I will post updates here in text, photo, and video here shortly!.

14 July, 2014

When rushed for time, don't rush...

As you know, Dave's Workshop is a hobby shop. The only thing professional about it is the tools I still own that I used when I was a professional mechanic lin my youth. Yeah those tools are now considered "Classic" so that should tell you something...

So as I hinted to, I have been busy, too busy, with things that actually pay the bills, and dealing with extended family issues. (Not going into too many details other to say we have had a couple of losses recently...)

Now with all of that, the projects that need to get done, well, take a back seat... And one of those projects has been repairing paint damage on the back of the cab, and front of the bed of my truck that was caused by the toolbox rubbing... So I tried to take what little time I had available, specifically while my wife was getting her nails done, and found an abandoned part of the parking lot, some wax and tar cleaner, clean rags, newspaper, frog tape, sandpaper / sanding block, and primer, not to mention the color coat...

Everything went great, until well... after.

It would appear in my haste to maximize my time, I didn't do a good enough masking job on the back window of the truck, OR between cab and bed. I now need to clean red primer off of the back glass, and spray a bit more color coat between cab and bed. THEN I need to move on to more wet sanding, and another coat or two of color before I move forward with clear...

Now this is the first time I have ever attempted this, and I must admit, I am scared senseless to try this, but I figure with the amount of paint damage that was there already, I had to try, or simply cough out for a fresh paint job...

Duplicolor has some great videos on actually how to do this, and I highly recommend anyone that wants to try this on their own, to dig up those videos on Youtube and watch them first....